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Children's Justice Act Resources

Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice: A Notice by the Indian Affairs Bureau on 01/17/2014 - The regulations implementing the Indian Child Welfare Act provide that Indian tribes may designate an agent other than the tribal chairman for service of notice of proceedings under the Act. This notice includes the current list of designated tribal agents for service of notice.

Since 1989, the Federal Assistance Division within the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) has provided funding to American Indian tribes through the Children’s Justice Act (CJA) Partnerships for Indian Communities grant program. These funds are used to help tribes develop, establish, and operate programs to improve the investigation, prosecution, and handling of child abuse cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, in a manner that limits additional trauma to the child victim. Fifteen percent of the first $20 million of funds from the Crime Victims Fund that are transferred to the Department of Health and Human Services as part of the Children's Justice Act are to be statutorily reserved by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) to make grants for the purpose of assisting Native American Indian tribes in developing, establishing, and operating programs designed to improve the handling of child abuse cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, in a manner which limits additional trauma to the child victim and improves the investigation and prosecution of cases of child abuse.

Activities Funded Through CJA

  • Establishment, expansion, and training for multidisciplinary teams.
  • Revision of tribal codes to address child sexual abuse.
  • Provision of child advocacy services for children involved in court proceedings.
  • Development of protocols and procedures for reporting, investigating, and prosecuting child sexual abuse cases.
  • Improved coordination that minimizes the number of child interviews.
  • Enhanced case management and treatment services.
  • Specialized training for prosecutors, judges, investigators, and other professionals who handle child sexual abuse cases.
  • Development of procedures for establishing and managing child-centered interview rooms.

The goal of the CJA grant program is to improve the capacity of existing tribal systems to handle serious child abuse cases by developing specialized services and procedures that address the needs of American Indian child victims. The program focuses on developing strategies to handle cases of child sexual abuse, from the initial disclosure through investigation and prosecution to case resolution. Read More >>>

Tribal Response to Child Abuse Resource Series

As the training and technical assistance provider for CJA grantees, the Tribal Law and Policy Institute has developed resources and training materials to assist Tribes with the development of their projects. The Institute provides training for CJA grantees on the development of Child Protection Teams, Multi-disciplinary Teams, Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse, and has assisted Tribes in developing other training efforts emphasizing local and regional resources available to address child abuse and child sexual abuse. Regional and national training events for CJA grantees are also provided and may focus on topics or skills, such as "Trauma and Tribal Children", "Investigations and Interventions in Child Sexual Abuse Cases in Indian Country", etc.

Tribal Legal Code Resource: Crimes Against Children (or Microsoft Word 2007 Format) has been developed by the Tribal Law and Policy Institute under a Children's Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities training and technical assistance grant. Specifically it has been developed to provide assistance to tribes and tribal organizations that have also received Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities grants. Tribes frequently request assistance in developing and/or updating their laws to address victimization of tribal children. The Institute developed this Resource Guide and Workbook to meet the identified need. This project was conceived in 2001 under the guidance of an Advisory Committee of experts in the tribal justice field, those working with Native child abuse and child victimization issues, and with tribal child and family services providers. The Crimes Against American Indian/Alaska Native Children Resource Guide provides illustrative examples, narrative, and discussion questions. The discussion questions direct users through a tailoring process that will assure that the resulting draft statutory provisions reflect the needs and values of the tribal community that the targeted law serves.

Community Facilitator's Guidebook - The Tribal Law and Policy Institute announced the release of Pathway To Hope: Healing Child Sexual Abuse at the January 2008 Alaska Native Summit on Child Sexual Abuse which was held in Anchorage, Alaska. The video was developed through funds from the Office for Victims of Crime as a resource to Tribes receiving the Children's Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities grants to address child sexual abuse and serious child abuse. This video, which presents the voices of over 40 Native people, many of whom are survivors of child sexual abuse, and the Community Facilitator's Guidebook provide a step by step process for Tribal communities to end silence about child sexual abuse, support child victims and promote healing of those who suffered childhood abuse. The video opens with five different languages spoken by Native elders in Alaska as they give permission and urge attention on the issues of child sexual abuse for the sake of our children. Due to the sensitive issues addressed by the video and the need for guidance in using this product and the Guidebook for community education, we welcome the opportunity to provide onsite training and technical assistance on the use of these products.

Child Abuse Protocol Development Guide Adobe Acrobat is required to view this file. was developed by the Tribal Law and Policy Institute as a workbook with sample protocols, forms and flow charts. The concept of protecting children and families from various dangers is not new to most Native communities. In fact there have been standards and mechanisms in place, both cultural and societal, for eons that have guided how Native Peoples addressed safety of children and instructions for adults as to how they behaved with children. These practices have had a significant impact on preventing abusive and neglectful behavior from occurring.

A Best Practice Approach for Tribal Advocates Working with Native Children who have Suffered Abuse Adobe Acrobat is required to view this file. suggests an approach to evaluating the needs of children who enter the child protection system and suggests a context for the evaluation that is culturally consistent with most tribal child rearing philosophies.

Perceptions of Methamphetamine use in three Western Tribal Communities: Implications for Child Abuse in Indian Country Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view this file Indian country lacks both a macro and micro study of child abuse and methamphetamines. Because so little is documented routinely by either law enforcement, social services or medical professionals in assessing risks and dangers to children from environments where meth is found, data is difficult to find. However, in an attempt to explore the increasing concerns raised by the emerging methamphetamine epidemic in Indian country, professionals from three Western Tribal communities were asked to complete a survey about their perceptions of meth us and implications for child abuse in the communities in which they worked. This study was funded through the Training and Technical Assistance grant that the Tribal Law and Policy Institute receives for Children’s Justice Act Partnerships in Indian Communities to assist tribes in addressing serious child abuse. The tribes and individuals that participated in the study were guaranteed anonymity due to the sensitive nature of the questions being asked. However, each Tribal Council provided permission for the surveys to be conducted within their service areas.

Understanding the Effects of Childhood Trauma on Brain Development in Native Children Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view this file – By Eidell Wasserman, Ph.D. CJA grantees have requested information that will assist them in educating others about the impact of victimization and trauma on brain development in young Native children. This full color document is a summary of the current research, and includes graphics and several “story boxes” to help readers understand the scientific basis and provide practical information on how trauma affects children. 

Tips for Non-Native Medical Providers Working in Alaska Native Communities Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view this file was developed by the Tribal Law and Policy Institute in response to frequent requests for information to assist non-Native people in responding appropriately to Native children and families when there are allegations or disclosures of child abuse and child sexual abuse. This document is specific to medical personnel, but similar versions are also available for State child protection workers, CASAs, and victim advocates working with Native children. For more information, please contact Diane Payne, Children's Justice Specialist, at 907-770-1950.

Basic Guidelines for Forensic Interviewers in Child Sexual Abuse Cases in Indian Country and Alaska Native Communities Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view this file by Roe Bubar, J.D., is intended to provide an overview of the primary considerations necessary in the interview process when allegations of child sexual abuse arise in Indian Country and Alaska Native communities. Forensic interviews are an important part of the investigative process, require specialized training and involve complex issues. This document outlines three areas of particular concern and is not intended to be a training tool that informs or guides the interview process.

General Resources

(see also Child Abuse and Neglect and Indian Child Welfare Act pages)

The National Center on Sexual Behavior of Youth is a national training and technical assistance center developed by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The Center is designed to provide states, territories, and the District of Columbia with information and support through national training and technical assistance in the management of children with sexual behavior problems and adolescent sex offenders.

Victim Services: Promising Practices in Indian Country (2004) is an OVC monograph  produced by the Tribal Law and Policy Institute that describes promising practices for assisting victims of violence and abuse in twelve Indian Country locations throughout the United States. Each description includes the program’s keys to success, relevant demographic data, and a contact for further information.

The OVC/BIA District Specific Training Program is an ongoing effort designed to assist U.S. Attorneys in complying with federal crime victims' legislation and to improve the response of federal criminal justice personnel to the rights and needs of victims of federal crime. The program provides skills-building training to tribal and federal criminal justice personnel and others who assist crime victims in Indian Country.

National Association for Prevention of Child Abuse & Neglect (Australia), provides many child abuse and neglect resources generally as well as some colorful and well-designed Aboriginal books and story posters addressing various aspects of child abuse and support for child victims.

The Indian Health Service and Office for Victims of Crime Child Abuse Project (IHS/OVC Child Abuse Project) has demonstrated over the past 4 years its effectiveness in reaching this vulnerable and hidden population (child victims of abuse and neglect); providing medical evaluation where they live, in a timely, affordable, sensitive and confidential manner, while bringing state of the art technology and a high standard of care to rural and isolated areas. This project is supported by many individuals at many levels, including the Indian Health Service, Office for Victims of Crime, the service units and Tribes who sent participants, the vendors of the hardware and software utilized by the project, and the compassion and dedication of the project’s participants and well-known national faculty.

Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities

Below is a description of the programs that have received Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities in recent years. The general focus of the CJA funding from OVC has remained the same, but the scope of the grant and the funding amount has changed since these projects were funded.

Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association - Alaska

Grant Manager – Richard Krause, VPSO Coordinator

Award Number: 1999-VI-GX-0006

Amount: $125,300.00 – S-2

$123,000.00 – S-1

$122,083.00 – First Year

Total: $370,383.00 (ended December 31, 2002)

Project Summary:

The purpose of this project is to continue the enhancement and delivery of direct service response to child abuse within the Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association Region (A/PIA). Objectives include: (1) Organizing the Child Abuse Response Teams in each village in the region; (2) strengthening the child abuse providers management systems within the A/PIA Region with training, education, and cooperation between the professional service providers; (3) developing written protocols and operating procedures regarding child abuse cases, intake, and reporting for the child abuse response teams; and (4) providing child abuse prevention, outreach, and education in the A/PIA Region villages.

Blackfeet Tribal Business Council – Montana

Grant Manager – Patty Young Running Crane

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0004

Amount: $60,000.00 – First Year

$75,000.00 – S1

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to improve the investigation, prosecution and overall handling of child abuse cases on the Blackfeet Indian reservation. The primary objectives are to: (1) establish a Blackfeet Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) and cooperative partnerships between all agencies involved in the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases; (2) organize and provide training to facilitate the development of the MDT and identify roles and responsibilities; (3) develop written protocols and operating procedures regarding child abuse cases, intake and reporting; (4) provide child abuse prevention, outreach and community awareness.

Chevak Tribal Court – Alaska

Grant Manager – Richard Slats

Award Number: 1999-VI-GX-0003

Amount: $130,764.00 S-1

$131,208.00

Total: $261,972.00

Project Summary:

The goal of this program is to develop a child advocacy training and resource center to provide services to child abuse victims in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta (YK Delta) in Southwestern Alaska. The intent of the proposed program is to establish collaboration between all agencies with concurrent jurisdiction in child abuse cases to better serve child victims and their families.

Chugachmiut – Alaska (ended September 2002)

Award Number: 1999-VI-GX-0002

Amount: $100,000.00 S-2

$ 99,535.00 S-1

$ 60,000.00

Total: $259,535.00

Project Summary:

The purpose of this project is to improve collaboration between the Chugach Region Tribal providers, Child Protection Teams and itinerant health care providers with representatives of the two State of Alaska agencies statutorily responsible for child sexual abuse intervention, investigation, and prosecution – the Division of Family and Youth Services (DFYS) and the Alaska State Troopers (AST).

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

Grant Manager – Regina Rosario

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0007

Amount: $54,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to improve the investigation, prosecution, and overall handling of child abuse cases through enhanced capacity building and operations of the Tribal Child Advocacy Center (TCAC). Grant objectives are to hire a child abuse investigator; provide training and education to the CAC staff, Cherokee School System, and the Tribal Community and improve case management and record keeping.

Emmonak Women’s Shelter – Alaska

Grant Manager – Lenora Hootch

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0008

Amount: $60,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to develop a program that will assist child victims who witness violence to receive child friendly services, support, and healing opportunities within the Emmonak Culture. The primary objectives are to: (1) hire a Children’s Service Coordinator who will focus on the needs of child victims and witnesses; (2) conduct a needs assessment in Emmonak by interviewing key people in the community about child abuse and how sexual assault and domestic violence affect children; (3) develop community education presentations to educate specific groups such as domestic violence victims, school personnel, tribal leaders, and elders about how children are impacted by physical and sexual abuse and witnessing violence.

Ft. Berthold coalition Against Domestic Violence – North Dakota

Grant Manager – Roberta Crows Breast

Award Number: 1999-VI-GX-0004

Amount: $60,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

Project Summary:

The goal of this program is to reduce child victimization through the provision of enhanced victim assistance services for sexually abused and severe physically abused children on the Ft. Berthold reservation. The project will focus on those child abuse victims who enter the Coalition’s domestic violence shelter with their battered mother.

Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians

Grant Manager – Anita Hall

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0001

Amount: $60,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to improve the existing child protection system and strengthen existing partnerships with professionals who handle child sexual abuse cases. The primary objectives of the project are to: (1) assess the current GTB system for handling cases of child abuse; (2) revise codes and policies involving children and relating to the handling of child abuse cases; (3) evaluate the current level of training for social service, criminal justice, medical and mental health personnel; (4) assess the community’s perceptions and awareness of the existence of child abuse in the GTB community; and (5) develop a culturally appropriate protocol and make specific recommendations for the improved handling of child abuse cases in the GBT community.

Kawerak, Inc. – Alaska

Grant Manager – Melissa Taylor

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0006

Amount: $60,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to assist the Kawerak Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) improve the investigation, prosecution, and handling of child physical and sexual abuse cases in the Bering Strait Region of Alaska. The objectives are to: (1) provide comprehensive training on the roles and responsibilities of the regional MDT; (2) establish a Child Protection Team (CPT) in each village in the Bering Strait region to decrease initial response time; and (3) increase community awareness of child sexual and physical abuse issues in the region.

Lac Du Flambeau Band – Wisconsin

Grant Manager – Linda Daniels

Award Number: 1999-VI-GX-0005

Amount: $60,000.00 Initial

$75,000.00 S-1

Project Summary:

The purpose of this project is to develop and enhance the communication and coordination between the Lac Du Flambeau Tribe and the Vilas County agencies in the handling of child abuse cases, particularly the prosecution of cases. The tribe will coordinate efforts to increase the amount of available services provided to victims of child abuse, reduce the trauma to these victims, and prevent duplication of investigations and services.

Laguna Pueblo – New Mexico

Grant Manager – Fran Flores

Award Number: 97-VR-GX-0001

Amount: $50,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

$75,000.00 – S2

$75,000.00 – S3

Project Summary:

The overall project goal for the Crime Victim Assistance Program is to provide immediate assistance (i.e., medical care, shelter, counseling, compensation, court room advocacy, transportation, case information/status, etc.) to all victims of crime with and emphasis on victims of child sexual, physical and emotional abuse and their families. Objectives are: (1) identify and facilitate the resolution of problems involving federal and tribal laws concerning child victims; (2) develop written materials to be provided to non offending family members of child victims; (3) train staff on their responsibilities for child victims and witnesses; (4) work with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Tribal courts, the U.S. Probation Office and the Tribal Probation Office on meeting the needs of child victims; (5) collaborate with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the development of a child abuse investigation and court preparation procedural manual; and (6) maintain records and document statistics on cases referred to the Victim Assistance Program.

Lummi Indian Nation – Washington (ended in 2002)

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0002

Amount: $60,000.00

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to improve the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases by refining existing tribal services and procedures to address the needs of Lummi Children. The primary objectives are to; (1) assess the current scope of the child abuse problem and develop a long term Indian Child Protection strategy; (2) establish and maintain communication between Indian and non-Indian child protection agencies; (3) strengthen existing protocol agreement for effective child protection; and (4) expand tribal court prosecution services.

Nez Perce Tribe – Idaho (ended in 2002)

Grant Manager – Paula Moody

Award Number: 1996-VI-GX-0008

Amount: $60,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

$ 88,387.00 S-2

$ 80,000.00 S-3

$ 75,000.00 S-4

Total: $378,387.00

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to improve the tribe’s child protection system for investigating and prosecuting child abuse cases as the Tribe transitions to Tribally managed from BIA management of child protection. The main objectives are to: (1) enhance the services of the Child Abuse Specialist and Child Protection Worker to maintain the central reporting office for all child sexual abuse referrals and complaints; (2) improve coordination and communication with the Tribal Police, Tribal Prosecutor, FBI, and the county Department of Health and Welfare’s Families and Children Services; (3) provide intensive in-service training on the recently approved Protocol for Child Sexual Abuse; and (4) improve the working relationship between the federal, state and tribal Victim Witness Coordinators through a Memorandum of Understanding between all agencies.

Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas - Wisconsin

Grant Manager – Richard Young

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0010

Amount: $59, 427.00

$75,000.00 – S1

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to improve the Red Cliff Band’s Child Protection system for reservation children through intense training, partnership building, and by improving the relationship among pertinent jurisdictions. Primary objectives are to: (1) improve case handling, investigation, and prosecution of child abuse by providing a comprehensive training and education program for direct participants in child abuse investigations and for personnel that are required to report suspicions of child abuse; (2) assess the feasibility of providing an interview environment that is more accessible and acceptable to potential victims and whether a reservation based initial interview capability would lessen the traumatic impact to child abuse victims; and (3) improve coordination systems in child abuse cases through the establishment of both internal and external teams to deal effectively with child abuse.

Shoshone & Arapaho Joint Business Council – Wyoming

Grant Manager – John Vinich

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0012

Amount: $82,275.00

Project Summary:

The purpose of this project is to develop a coordinated system for handling child sexual and severe physical abuse cases on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The primary objectives are to: (1) improve the prosecution of child abuse crimes through employment of designated staff to monitor the status of the cases and to promote prosecution of child abuse on the reservation; (2) improve the investigation of child abuse and significant neglect cases by providing for forensic interviewing in a child friendly center by trained interviewers; (3) improve the understanding of child abuse issues through re-visiting the Tribal Law and Order Code regarding child abuse and neglect; and (4) implement community and professional awareness about the benefits of a Child Advocacy Center and the use of forensic interviewing, multi-disciplinary teams, and protocols of child advocacy centers to assist child abuse victims and their families.

South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency - Washington

Grant Manager – Ruth Garrett

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0003

Amount: $65,687.00

Project Summary:

The overall goal of this project is to develop, implement, and demonstrate a multi-year model project for improving the investigation, prosecution, and treatment of cases of serious child abuse and neglect, and child sexual abuse within five tribal communities in Western Washington. The five tribes are a Chehalis, Nisqually, Skokomish, Squaxin Island, and Shoalwater Bay.

Spirit Lake Tribal Social Services - North Dakota

Grant Manager – Donna Wilkie Johnson

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0005

Amount: $60,000.00

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to develop a program and resources to improve the investigation, prosecution, and overall handling of child abuse cases in a manner that lessens additional trauma to child victims on the Spirit Lake reservation.

Standing Rock Lake Oahe Group – North/South Dakota

Grant Manager – Lynn Provost

Award Number: 96-VI-GX-0013

Amount: $69,605.00

$72,583.00 – S1

$75,000.00 – S2

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to provide services to improve the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases. The primary objectives are to reduce trauma to child victims by providing intensive counseling services to socially abused children and their families, and to develop an effective case management system. The counseling would consist of in-home counseling, court ordered counseling, group therapy, and follow up services to ensure a positive family reunification.

The Suquamish Tribe - Washington

Grant Manager – Dennis Deaton

Award Number:

Amount:

Project Summary:

The overall goal of this project is to lessen the traumatic impact of severe child abuse and child sexual abuse to victims imposed by multiple interviews and investigations through multi-jurisdictional agencies. The primary objectives are to: (1) formalize the Child Protection Team (CPT) and their roles and responsibilities; (2) review and revise the Suquamish Child Abuse Protocol and the Tribal Protection Codes; (3) develop a training program for the Suquamish CPT and all relevant staff; and (4) identify and enhance coordination between all agencies that are involved in child abuse cases.

Two Feathers Indian Child Welfare – California

Grant Manager – Pamela Leach

Award Number: 1999-VI-GX-0008

Amount: $60,000.00

$75,000.00 – S1

$75,000.00 – S2

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to design and develop systems that will facilitate full disclosure, investigation, and prosecution of child abuse and child sexual abuse. The primary objectives are to complete an analysis of the cultural competency community assessments of child abuse service providers, develop a training curriculum on cultural competency; develop culturally relevant model protocols for native and non-Native agencies and service providers; provide specialized training to agency personnel involved in child abuse cases; facilitate therapeutic services for sexually abused victims; and provide enhanced case planning and management for child abuse victims and their families.

Wicona Wawokiya, Inc. (Crow Creek Nation) – South Dakota

Grant Manager – Lisa Thompson

Award Number: 2000-VR-GX-0002

Amount: $ 60,000.00

$100,000.00 S-1

$ 75,000.00 S-2

Total: $235,000.00

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to establish telemedical support for reservation medical providers on the Crow Creek reservation in order to reduce or eliminate extensive travel by child sexual abuse victims. The project will be housed at the Children’s Safe Place, and approved children’s advocacy center and full member of the National Children’s Alliance Center.

Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska – Nebraska

Grant Manager – Becky Thomas

Award Number: 1996-VI-GX-0006

Amount: $ 80,503.00 Initial

$ 75,000.00 S-1

$ 75,000.00 S-2

$ 75,000.00 S-3

Total: $305,503.00

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to improve and expand the tribe’s services for the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases. The tribe will continue the use of its Quick Response Team to serve as first responders to child abuse cases. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) to continue the services of the Special Investigator who will investigate reports of child abuse, evaluate the situation on-site, and outline the emergency assistance required prior to transferring the case to Child Protective Services; (2) to complete development of a comprehensive case tracking system that will compile statistics on child abuse reports, investigations, prosecution, and other data generated by the project; (3) to continue specialized training for the Quick Response Team, investigator, prosecutor, school and health department, emergency medical technicians and other tribal personnel involved in child abuse cases; and (4) to provide comprehensive services that will protect the best interests of Indian children and their families.

Yankton Sioux Tribe – South Dakota

Grant Manager – Janet Johnson

Award Number: 2001-VI-GX-0009

Amount: $53,635.00

Project Summary:

The goal of this project is to protect child abuse victims from unnecessary trauma through direct advocacy, training, and education of all entities and staff involved in the referral, interview and court process. The main objectives are to: (1) develop a child advocacy program on the Yankton Sioux reservation; (2) conduct a community readiness assessment to identify available and needed resources for implementing the program; (3) develop a formal interagency protocol for investigating, prosecuting and providing treatment for child abuse cases through the tribal criminal justice system.

 

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Office of Justice Programs Standard Forms & Instructions

All recipients of Office of Justice Programs grants must periodically complete both bi-annual narrative progress reports and quarterly financial status reports (269's).

In order to view these documents in their fill able form, you MUST have Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0.

Please note that Acrobat Reader 5.0 only will allow you to view, fill in, and print the form, not save it.

Outline and Instructions for Preparing FY 2006 Progress Reports

Categorical Assistance Progress Report

PROGRESS REPORTING PERIOD

Reporting Quarter Reports Due Not Later Than
Jan 1 through Jun 30 July 30
July 1 through December 31 Jan 30

 

FINANCIAL STATUS REPORTING

Reporting Quarter Reports Due Not Later Than
Jan 1 through Mar 31  May 15
Apr 1 through Jun 30  Aug 14
Jul 1 through Sep 30 Nov 14
Oct 1 through Dec 31 Feb 14

Grantees should submit their completed forms on the Grants Management System.

GMS Hotline: 1–888–549–9901

Email: askoc@ojp.usdoj.gov

Fax: (202) 353-8475 or (202) 616-5962

Addresses:

Office for Victims of Crime
U.S. Department of Justice
810 Seventh Street NW., Eighth Floor
Washington, DC 20531
202–307–5983 Fax: 202–514–6383

OVC Resource Center
P.O. Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849–6000
1-800-851-3420
E-mail: askovc@ojp.usdoj.gov

OVC Training and Technical Assistance Center
10530 Rosehaven Street, Suite 400
Fairfax, VA 22030
1–866–OVC–TTAC (1–866–682–8822)(TTY 1–866–682–8880)
Fax: 703–279–4673
E-mail: TTAC@ovcttac.org

 

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